Civil War Quick Tip – Free Genealogy Research!!

Civil War blog reading

Photo Credit: Unsplash

Don’t forget that usually around patriotic holidays most subscription-based genealogy websites offer a few days on their site for free. It is of course their way of showing you all they have to offer in the hope you’ll find lots of value and subscribe. Fold3, the database for military records has done this in the past.

Let me stress, I don’t have inside info but with Memorial Day weekend less than two weeks away Fold3 may offer a free weekend for you to research their records.

If you don’t have a Fold3 subscription you might want to plan on taking advantage of a free offer if it does happen. Start a research log for the veteran you’re researching. List what you already know, regiment, company, enlistment dates, etc. Then state your goal(s), the questions about his service you are attempting to answer.

With this kind of prep work done you’ll be able to take some time out of your busy holiday weekend and make the most of the records on the site.

If a free research weekend isn’t offered or you just don’t have the spare time during the holiday you’ll still have your research log and goals ready to go either for the next free research weekend or you can try your local library. Many libraries have a subscription to Ancestry, Fold 3 and so on. It’s available to those members with a library card so you may want to check that out as well.

Good luck researching and if you find some good stuff leave me a comment. I’d love to hear what you found!

P.S. Happy Memorial Day!

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Ancestors In A Nation DividedIf you’re interested in focusing your research on your Civil War ancestor check out Ancestors In A Nation Divided – available in Kindle and also in paperback. Only $15.77 on Amazon. Great help as you seek your veteran’s place in our country’s history.

 

Also I’d love for you to sign up for my monthly Civil War Research Tips – Finding More on Your Civil War Ancestor here. I’ll share pointers and info to help in researching your Civil War ancestor. Please take a moment to sign up and thanks so much!

Civil War Saturday – My ancestor died on the battlefield. So where’s he buried? Part 1.5

Happy Civil War Saturday friends!!

This is Part 1.5 of My ancestor died on the battlefield. So where’s he buried?

If you checked my last post you saw the research log I’m using. Listed are the resources I’m checking as I begin my research on where my Civil War ancestor who died on a little known, remote battlefield may be buried.

Now just as a recap we’re talking about my first cousin four times removed George S Vanmeter. He was with Co. G 9th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry and was killed in a skirmish with Confederate forces April 12, 1864 on the Jack Peters plantation outside of Florence, Alabama.

Only three men were killed in this small battle. One Confederate and two Union soldiers. The rest of Company G was captured by the men of the 27th and 35th Alabama and sent to Andersonville.

As far as I know his body was not brought back to Ohio for burial. I have never seen a gravesite for him at the cemeteries he would likely be buried at. As family historians I know you’ll understand, I frequent these cemeteries several times a year.

So this round of research includes:

Find-a-grave
Billion Graves
Names in Stone
*Ohio Gen-Web TombstoneTranscription Project
Internment
National Cemeteries

 

Research Log

As you can see my research at these websites did not yield any results but is a good place to start in trying to find where he is buried.

Next week we’ll take a field trip and do some on site research at a repository. See you next Saturday.

*Check the state’s Gen-Web site where your ancestor was from.

Civil War Saturday – My ancestor died on the battlefield. So where’s he buried? Part 1

Research Log
Last week we talked about the brick wall I’ve been working on recently. I have a Civil War ancestor that died in the war and I don’t know where he’s buried. So for the next couple Saturdays I’ll share my research and outcomes with you. Hopefully you’ll find a resource or two that you were not aware of or one you may want to go back and try again.

Now just as a recap we’re talking about my first cousin four times removed George S Vanmeter. He was with Co. G 9th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry and was killed in a skirmish with Confederate forces April 12, 1864 on the Jack Peters plantation outside of Florence, Alabama.

Only three men were killed in this small battle. One Confederate and two Union soldiers. The rest of Company G was captured by the men of the 27th and 35th Alabama and sent to Andersonville.

As far as I know his body was not brought back to Ohio for burial. I have never seen a gravesite for him at the cemeteries he would likely be buried at. As family historians I know you’ll understand, I frequent these cemeteries several times a year.

Today I’m going to look at some standard online resources. I’m not sure how much I’ll learn, but who knows? I may be very surprised and find a nugget or two about him. So let’s begin.

I’ll pull out my research log and my goal will be to find where George S. Vanmeter is buried. I also have a To-Do list handy. That way if I run across another site, or link that will help in some of my other genealogy research I’ll note it and go back to it another time. I don’t want the enticing possibility of another research goal to get me off track of this search or become a time waster.

Check back with me this Saturday as I list out the resources on my research log! See you then!

March’s Newsletter – Finding More on Your Civil War Ancestor

Hidden Clues in Civil War HeadstonesMarch’s Newsletter –

Finding More on Your Civil War Ancestor is out. Did it land in your inbox? If not you’re missing links and suggestions for new ideas on researching your Civil War ancestor.

Sign up is in the right column over here   ——>   you’ll also receive Hidden Clues in Civil War Headstones totally free!

Don’t miss the one tip you need to break open the research on your Civil War ancestor. Sign up for Finding More on Your Civil War Ancestor today!

 

Jen Holik and Cindy Freed talk Military Research from Civil War to World War II

Jen Holik

Jen Holik

Jen Holik and I have had the privilege of writing for the In-Depth Genealogist magazine, Going In-Depth, for the last couple years.

Jen’s column specializes in World War II research. In fact Jen has two books coming out soon, Stories from the World War II Battlefield vol.1 & vol. 2 They’ll cover how to research all branches of the military in World War II. They’re a must have for your WWII research.

Jen and I’ve both been interviewed for the Meet the Writers series for the In-Depth Genealogist. It’s a fun way to learn about us and our research. You can find our interviews on YouTube. Jen’s here. Along with mine here.

After you watch both interviews you’ll see a lot of similarities in the records and sources Jen uses for World War II research and the ones I use in Civil War research.

The In-Depth Genealogist

When Jen and I realized we use similar records we decided to write blog posts comparing the records and strategies for research. Please read Jen’s post today describing her research methods for World War II records.

Here are my suggestions when researching your Civil War ancestor.

Where do you start?

Check the 1860 U.S. Federal Census for the location of your ancestor. You’ll need to know where your ancestor was living just prior to the Civil War to have a better idea which state’s militia he joined. The 1860 U.S. Federal Census can be found several places online like Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org.

Where do I find my ancestor’s enlistment dates and regiment? With his name and where he lived check the several online sources for enlistment info. These sites also list regimental histories which you’ll find valuable, learning about troop movements and battles fought.

*National Parks Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System

*FamilySearch.org

*Ancestry.com

*Fold3

*Try Individual State rosters too. For example the Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1865, Vols. 1-12 can be found online and in local libraries. Search the state roster from where your ancestor served.

Pvt George W Lowery Co. A 81st Pennsylvania, Genealogy, Family History

Pvt George W Lowery Co. A 81st Pennsylvania

How do I find out more about his military service? 

Through Pension Files and CMSR files at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Washington, D.C.

* First check United States Civil War and Later Pension Index 1861 – 1917 to see if your ancestor received a pension or the family applied for one. Index found at FamilySearch, Ancestry.com, Fold3.

* If your ancestor did receive a pension, request a copy from NARA. Using NATF Form 85 it can be ordered online at archives.gov for $ or you can download the form and mail it in. You have the option of receiving hard copies or a cd/dvd for your files.

* Compiled Military Service Record (CMSR) also at NARA is a file for each veteran containing muster rolls, pay vouchers, hospital rolls and so on. They can have additional information like  muster in and out dates, some limited biographical information: age, eye and hair color, height, weight. These can be ordered with form NATF 86 like the pension files above.

* Confederate soldiers did not receive a pension from the U.S. government. Confederate pensions were given by the individual southern states where the soldier served. NARA site has a listing for each southern state’s archives to contact for Confederate soldiers pensions. http://www.archives.gov/research/alic/reference/state-archives.html

What can I find in Courthouse Records? 

* Soldier’s Discharge Papers – Union veterans did receive discharge papers and were supposed to file them at their local courthouse once back home.

* Money account – In some counties families sent soldiers money via the local courthouse. Soldiers were able to send money home the same way.

* Graves Registration File – file of veterans buried in that particular county.

* Indigent Union Soldiers, Sailors and Marines Interment – if you’ve hit a brick wall, or not sure you’re ancestor was buried by family.

What are some online sources for Civil War research?

* Civil War Draft Registration Records – Ancestry.com

* Special Enumeration of Union Veterans and Widows aka 1890 Veterans Schedule FamilySearch and Ancestry.

* The Official Pension Roll of 1883 – Ancestry and Archive.org

* U.S. National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers – FamilySearch and Ancestry

* Confederate veterans – a list of state-run home can be found on the National Archives and Robert E. Lee Camp Confederate Soldiers’ Home Applications for Admission

Where else might I locate information? Your ancestor likely belonged to a veterans group after the war.

* Grand Army of the Republic

Library of Congress – http://www.loc.gov/rr/main/gar/

Grand Army of the Republic Library and Museum –  http://garmuslib.org/

* Sons of Union Veterans – http://www.garrecords.org/

* United Confederate Veterans – Archive.org – http://archive.org/search.php?query=creator%3A %22United+Confederate+Veterans%22

* Sons of Confederate Veterans –          http://sonsofconfederateveterans.blogspot.com/2011/01/records-of-united-confederate- veterans.html

Ancestors In A Nation Divided

There’s also more research help in my book, Ancestors in a Nation Divided. Please check it out.

and

Be sure to check Jen’s post today to learn about researching your WWII veteran!