Civil War Quick Tip

FBGenCircleLogo1Here is a database for researching the Applications for the Robert E. Lee Confederate Soldiers’ Home.

Be sure to click the links at the bottom of the page too for Robert E. Lee Confederate Soldiers’ Home Register of Residents, 1883 – 1939 and the About Robert E. Lee Confederate Soldiers’ Home Applications for Admission.

Exciting research possibility if you think your ancestor may have been a resident. Good luck! I hope you find some good stuff!

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If you’re interested in researching your Civil War ancestor’s story check out Ancestors In A Nation Divided – Kindle. Also in paperback. Great research help as you seek your veteran’s place in our country’s history.

Also I’d love for you to sign up for my monthly tipsCivil War Research Tips here. I’ll share pointers and info to help in researching your Civil War ancestor. Please take a moment to sign up and thanks so much!

My Evening with the Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War

Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War

Our guide Patty with the Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War tour

Two weeks ago I was in Gettysburg attending the national convention of the Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War, 1861 – 1865. It was a fun five days filled with convention happenings, battlefield trips and I even snuck in a little bit of genealogy research.

One of the highlights of the entire trip was a tour our little group took. We decided against a ghost tour. (I’ve been on two ghost tours in Gettysburg and never saw a ghost. Darn!) So we took the tour “The Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War”

Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War

This building still has the visible damage it received during the battle in 1863

Let me tell you it was excellent! Our guide Patty was in period dress and took us to see several homes of heroic local women who courageously worked amid the devastation of their town. As widows, teens or with their husbands gone off to war, these women aided both Union and Confederate wounded. They nursed hundreds of soldiers left behind in field hospitals and locations around the area. They buried the dead and worked to rebuild their damaged homes and businesses.

Some of the women highlighted in the tour are:

Lydia Liester – sold horse bones to put her farm back in pre-war condition

Josephine Miller – called the “Bravest Woman in Gettysburg”

Cornelia Hancock – youngest Union Civil War nurse

Lydia Hamilton Smith – collected food and clothing donations for field hospitals and donated her life savings

Liz Butler – Black woman captured by the Confederate Army

Elizabeth Thorn – wife of keeper of Evergreen Cemetery who buried 105 soldiers

Sallie Pickett – wife of Confederate General George Pickett

Jennie Wade – only civilian killed during the Battle of Gettysburg

Georgia McClellan – sister of Jennie Wade who worked as a Union nurse in Washington, D.C. to name just a few.

Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War

Our group listening to guide Patty. We’re across the street from Jenny Wade’s home.

Let me tell you my little group enjoyed our tour immensely. Our guide was well prepared and spoke knowledgeably on each of her subjects. We were happy with every aspect of our tour. If you are ever in Gettysburg I highly recommend you check it out.

Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War
Gravedigger tours – The Great T-Shirt Company
65 Steinwehr Avenue, Gettysburg, PA 17325
717-334-8611
www.gravediggertours.com
womenofgettysburg@gmail.com

In fact because we were so interested in the women discussed during the tour our guide Patty emailed me the list of names of the women and a list of reading material. Many of these books are wriiten by the women about their post battle experiences. With Patty’s permission here is that list.

SUGGESTED READING

South After Gettysburg, Letters of Cornelia Hancock 1863-1865
by Cornelia Hancock

At Gettysburg or What a Girl Saw and Heard of the Battle
by Mrs. Matilda (Tillie Pierce) Alleman

The Diary of a Lady of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania: From June 15 to July 15, 1863
by Pennsylvania Lady of Gettysburg (1863) Sarah Broadhead

The Ties of the Past The Gettysburg Diary of Salome (Sallie) Myers Stewart 1854-1922
by Sarah Sites Thomas

The Shrivers Story
by Nancie W. Gudmestad

They Fought Like Demons Women Soldiers in the Civil War
by Deanne Blanton and Lauren M. Cook

Women at Gettysburg 1863
By Eileen F. Conklin

Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War

Our final stop during the Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War tour

Segregation in Death Gettysburg Lincoln Cemetery
by Betty Dorsey Myers available by mail order
Lincoln Cemetery Project Foundation
408 Long Lane
Gettysburg, PA 17325 send $18.00 ($15 for book and $3 shipping)

Thank you Patty for your friendliness, an awesome tour and the chance to continue learning about the Women of Gettysburg.

Civil War Quick Tip

FBGenCircleLogo1Starting with tomorrow’s Civil War Saturday post I’m going to run a short series of articles on Civil War heritage groups. Groups like Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV), Sons of Union Veterans (SUV), United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC), Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War (DUVCW), LGAR, Women’s Relief Corps (WRC), etc.

My aim is to let people know they exist and how to join them. The first three groups to be highlighted are Sons of Confederate Veterans, Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War and United Daughters of the Confederacy. The SCV post will publish tomorrow.

If you’re a member of a Civil War heritage group not mentioned and would like to write a post about your organization contact me. I’d love to include any and all groups with roots dating back to the Civil War. I’ve already received a couple comments that folks weren’t aware these groups exist. Who knows your group may gain some new members!

Be sure to stop back for Civil War Saturday and we’ll see how the Civil War impacts lives today

P.S. I still need a post from a Son of Union Veterans! Can you help a girl out?

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If you’re interested in researching your Civil War ancestor’s story check out Ancestors In A Nation Divided – Kindle. Also in paperback. Great research help as you seek your veteran’s place in our country’s history.

Also I’d love for you to sign up for my monthly tipsCivil War Research Tips here. I’ll share pointers and info to help in researching your Civil War ancestor. Please take a moment to sign up and thanks so much!

Civil War Quick Tip: Really? I was fascinated by this guy’s story

FBGenCircleLogo1A couple of years ago I wrote a monthly article for a local Civil War Roundtable’s newsletter. I was in charge of writing about the next meeting’s speaker. One month the speaker was an acquaintance of mine. His office was one floor below where I worked. It was one of the easier interviews to set up and write.

The guy I was interviewing was easy-going and didn’t know a stranger. After talking about his collection of reproduced Civil War firearms he spoke of his own Civil War ancestor.

His great grandfather had fought with a company raised in our hometown. He survived the war, completing his enlistment, but not without a lasting affect. It seems his great grandfather spent nearly every night after coming home from the war going downtown to a local bar. Then later that evening my friend’s great grandmother went to the bar and brought her drunken husband home.

Apparently this Civil War veteran held a job during the day but needed booze nearly every night to chase the ghosts and ease the pain of his war years. My friend then relayed how the Civil War had a direct impact on his life.

His grandmother, the veteran’s daughter grew up with this drunken father. She was vehemently opposed to drinking throughout her life. Her own daughter, my interview’s mother, was also staunchly against drinking and my friend remembered the many lectures he received about the evils of drinking from both women as he grew up.

It was only later in his life, when this man working well into his retirement years, realized it wasn’t that his mother and grandmother didn’t trust him when it came to drinking. They were hurt by their loved one’s traumatic war experience and how he coped with it. They didn’t want that life for their son and grandson.

I was fascinated by this guy’s story. Who would have thought this man in his early seventies could pin-point how the Civil War had affected his life decades later? Even into the 21st century!

Do you have a similar family practice or belief that’s been passed down through the generations? Can you trace a family habit, good or bad, to a specific ancestor?

Write your story down. Blog about it, even if it’s only two paragraphs long. Don’t lose that insight to history. You’ll not only preserve another valuable piece of your family history but it may jog our memory, your readers, to some of our own specific family beliefs or customs.

If you do write a blog post or already have please leave a link in the comments. We all love to read the stories that make our ancestors real people. I hope you do I’m looking forward to it!

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If you’re interested in researching your Civil War ancestor’s story check out Ancestors In A Nation Divided – Kindle. Also in paperback. Great research help as you seek your veteran’s place in our country’s history.

Also I’d love for you to sign up for my monthly tipsCivil War Research Tips here. I’ll share pointers and info to help in researching your Civil War ancestor. Please take a moment to sign up and thanks so much!

Civil War Quick Tip – In His Own Words: Isaac Newton Carr

FBGenCircleLogo1One of the best things about blogging is meeting new people. I did just that this past week when “cmkinhunter” left a comment on one of my posts. She wrote about her Civil War ancestors and her research.

She said, ” . . . I hit the mother-load of information when I discovered his journals at the Iowa State Historical Society a few years ago. My ancestor began journaling in September 1861 when he entered service and continued journaling throughout his life as a farmer and businessman — right up to his death in 1923. His Civil War experiences are covered in his 1861, 1862 and 1865 journals. He must have lost his 1863-1864 journals as they were not in the collection.

I finally started a blog and am posting some of the more interesting journal entries. I’ve just gotten to 1865. If you are interested in reading what a solder from the 11th Iowa Infantry experienced, please visit my site at http://cmkinhuntercm.wordpress.com/. My blog is titled “In His Own Words: Isaac Newton Carr 1836-1923″.

So I did just that and let me say you really should visit this site. Each blog post is an entry from Isaac’s journal and the insight into a Civil War soldier’s life is exceptional.

Take for example January 3, 1865 Isaac talks about a walk through Savannah, having his picture made and the high price of goods for sale. Or Battle of Shiloh – April 6 & 7, 1862. To read the words of a soldier who was actually there gives me chills but Isaac’s words are honest and straightforward. You can trust what he’s written, no embellishments.

That’s what makes this site an excellent resource as you continue the research of your Civil War ancestor. Even if your veteran didn’t fight with the 11th Iowa Infantry, you’ll learn so much about your soldier’s daily life during the war. Through Isaac’s words you can follow in your ancestor’s footsteps. I highly recommend In His Own Words: Isaac Newton Carr 1836-1923

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If you’re interested in researching your Civil War ancestor’s story check out Ancestors In A Nation Divided – Kindle. Also in paperback. Great research help as you seek your veteran’s place in our country’s history.

Also I’d love for you to sign up for my monthly tipsCivil War Research Tips here. I’ll share pointers and info to help in researching your Civil War ancestor. Please take a moment to sign up and thanks so much!