Civil War Quick Tip – Why do some Civil War battles have two names?

FBGenCircleLogo1Did you know that Union Civil War soldiers referred to previous battles fought by the river, creek or water close to the site? Antietam (Creek) or Pittsburg Landing are a couple examples you may recognize. It was thought that since many Union soldiers came from urban areas and were so taken by the beauty of the south’s geography they talked about battles mentioning the local natural landmarks.

On the other hand, more Confederate soldiers were from rural areas and were captivated by the cities they marched through and the various structures they contained. So southern soldiers referred to previous battles fought by the closest town, city or building. Such as Sharpsburg (MD) or Shiloh (TN).

Perhaps you refer to a Civil War battle place in the same manner, according to which side your ancestor fought. Either way now you know why Manassas is also known as Bull Run or Murfreesboro is aka Stones River.

Good Luck as you continue researching your Civil War ancestor.

 

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Great gift idea! Are you or a family member researching your Civil War ancestor? Check out Ancestors In A Nation Divided – available in Kindle and also in paperback. Great research help as you seek your veteran’s place in our country’s history.

Email me:

cindy at genealogycircle dot com if you’d like to order a signed copy. Thanks!

Also I’d love for you to sign up for my monthly tipsCivil War Research Tips here. I’ll share pointers and info to help in researching your Civil War ancestor. Please take a moment to sign up and thanks so much!

Civil War Quick Tip – Union Draft Registration Records

FBGenCircleLogo1Did you know the first military draft enacted in this country was during the Civil War? As the months turned into years it was clear the war would not be ending anytime soon. Add to that the drop off in Union enlistments presented President Lincoln with a big problem.

By mid-1863 the president instituted the very first draft. All men from 20 to 45 years old were eligible to be drafted. There were two classes of men:

Class I included men 20 to 35 years old and all unmarried men 36 to 45 years old.
Class II were married men 36 to 45 years old.

Men who fit the above categories had to go to their local Provost Marshal’s office to sign up.

Today known as the Civil War Draft Registration Records they can be researched at Ancestry. A thorough explanation of the records can be found at FamilySearch.

Consider these records as an “off year” census to use in documenting where your northern male ancestors were living during the Civil War. Not only will you get their place of residence, also their age, marital status, occupation and if he had already served there may be a notation about that.

Good Luck as you continue researching your Civil War ancestor.

 

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If you’re interested in researching your Civil War ancestor’s story check out Ancestors In A Nation Divided – available in Kindle and also in paperback. Great research help as you seek your veteran’s place in our country’s history.

Also I’d love for you to sign up for my monthly tipsCivil War Research Tips here. I’ll share pointers and info to help in researching your Civil War ancestor. Please take a moment to sign up and thanks so much!

Civil War Quick Tip – Center for Civil War Photography

FBGenCircleLogo1Have you been to the website for the Center for Civil War Photography? It’s an excellent site devoted to Civil War photography, of course.

If you’re like me you just can’t get enough of photos taken during the war. This site will certainly help you out with that. With many special exhibits, thousands of Gettysburg pics on their Flickr page and lots of info, anyone with an interest in the Civil War will benefit from browsing their site. http://www.civilwarphotography.org/

Be sure to sign up for their newsletter too! In the most recent issue there was a short blurb on Duke University’s recent announcement of the digitization of both of Alexander Gardner’s Photographic Sketch Books of the Civil War and George Barnard’s Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign. Great to look through as you think about your Civl War ancestors and imagine them in these settings.

 

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If you’re interested in researching your Civil War ancestor’s story check out Ancestors In A Nation Divided – available in Kindle and also in paperback. Great research help as you seek your veteran’s place in our country’s history.

Also I’d love for you to sign up for my monthly tipsCivil War Research Tips here. I’ll share pointers and info to help in researching your Civil War ancestor. Please take a moment to sign up and thanks so much!

Civil War Quick Tip

FBGenCircleLogo1Here is a database for researching the Applications for the Robert E. Lee Confederate Soldiers’ Home.

Be sure to click the links at the bottom of the page too for Robert E. Lee Confederate Soldiers’ Home Register of Residents, 1883 – 1939 and the About Robert E. Lee Confederate Soldiers’ Home Applications for Admission.

Exciting research possibility if you think your ancestor may have been a resident. Good luck! I hope you find some good stuff!

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If you’re interested in researching your Civil War ancestor’s story check out Ancestors In A Nation Divided – Kindle. Also in paperback. Great research help as you seek your veteran’s place in our country’s history.

Also I’d love for you to sign up for my monthly tipsCivil War Research Tips here. I’ll share pointers and info to help in researching your Civil War ancestor. Please take a moment to sign up and thanks so much!

My Evening with the Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War

Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War

Our guide Patty with the Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War tour

Two weeks ago I was in Gettysburg attending the national convention of the Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War, 1861 – 1865. It was a fun five days filled with convention happenings, battlefield trips and I even snuck in a little bit of genealogy research.

One of the highlights of the entire trip was a tour our little group took. We decided against a ghost tour. (I’ve been on two ghost tours in Gettysburg and never saw a ghost. Darn!) So we took the tour “The Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War”

Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War

This building still has the visible damage it received during the battle in 1863

Let me tell you it was excellent! Our guide Patty was in period dress and took us to see several homes of heroic local women who courageously worked amid the devastation of their town. As widows, teens or with their husbands gone off to war, these women aided both Union and Confederate wounded. They nursed hundreds of soldiers left behind in field hospitals and locations around the area. They buried the dead and worked to rebuild their damaged homes and businesses.

Some of the women highlighted in the tour are:

Lydia Liester – sold horse bones to put her farm back in pre-war condition

Josephine Miller – called the “Bravest Woman in Gettysburg”

Cornelia Hancock – youngest Union Civil War nurse

Lydia Hamilton Smith – collected food and clothing donations for field hospitals and donated her life savings

Liz Butler – Black woman captured by the Confederate Army

Elizabeth Thorn – wife of keeper of Evergreen Cemetery who buried 105 soldiers

Sallie Pickett – wife of Confederate General George Pickett

Jennie Wade – only civilian killed during the Battle of Gettysburg

Georgia McClellan – sister of Jennie Wade who worked as a Union nurse in Washington, D.C. to name just a few.

Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War

Our group listening to guide Patty. We’re across the street from Jenny Wade’s home.

Let me tell you my little group enjoyed our tour immensely. Our guide was well prepared and spoke knowledgeably on each of her subjects. We were happy with every aspect of our tour. If you are ever in Gettysburg I highly recommend you check it out.

Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War
Gravedigger tours – The Great T-Shirt Company
65 Steinwehr Avenue, Gettysburg, PA 17325
717-334-8611
www.gravediggertours.com
womenofgettysburg@gmail.com

In fact because we were so interested in the women discussed during the tour our guide Patty emailed me the list of names of the women and a list of reading material. Many of these books are wriiten by the women about their post battle experiences. With Patty’s permission here is that list.

SUGGESTED READING

South After Gettysburg, Letters of Cornelia Hancock 1863-1865
by Cornelia Hancock

At Gettysburg or What a Girl Saw and Heard of the Battle
by Mrs. Matilda (Tillie Pierce) Alleman

The Diary of a Lady of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania: From June 15 to July 15, 1863
by Pennsylvania Lady of Gettysburg (1863) Sarah Broadhead

The Ties of the Past The Gettysburg Diary of Salome (Sallie) Myers Stewart 1854-1922
by Sarah Sites Thomas

The Shrivers Story
by Nancie W. Gudmestad

They Fought Like Demons Women Soldiers in the Civil War
by Deanne Blanton and Lauren M. Cook

Women at Gettysburg 1863
By Eileen F. Conklin

Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War

Our final stop during the Women of Gettysburg – Heroines of the Civil War tour

Segregation in Death Gettysburg Lincoln Cemetery
by Betty Dorsey Myers available by mail order
Lincoln Cemetery Project Foundation
408 Long Lane
Gettysburg, PA 17325 send $18.00 ($15 for book and $3 shipping)

Thank you Patty for your friendliness, an awesome tour and the chance to continue learning about the Women of Gettysburg.