Rebecca Holmes Williams Had Moxie #52Ancestors

Rebecca Holmes Williams and Family

Rebecca Holmes Williams and Family

Since March is Women’s History Month and I lucked into writing about a female ancestor last week I’m going to continue through the month honoring my female ancestors. This week I want to tell you about another of my great great grandmothers Rebecca Holmes.

Rebecca Holmes is a direct branch on my maternal side. She’s my mother’s, mother’s, mother’s, mother and in my mind she is a symbol of strength. Let me tell you why.

Rebecca was born 14 August 1833 to Margaret Junkins and William Holmes in Tuscarawas County, Ohio. She grew up in eastern Ohio and married Isaac Williams in 1853 when she was 20 years old.

Fast forward a couple years to 1860, Rebecca is the mother of two girls, her third child, a son lives only ten months. Add to that Rebecca’s fourth child another son lives just nine months before passing away. Rebecca has a fifth child yet another baby boy and is pregnant again when the family decides to move from Tuscarawas County to Allen County, Ohio. It’s not just this small family that makes the move. There is a passel of people that make this journey.

Rebecca Holmes Williams

Rebecca Holmes Williams

Along with Rebecca and Isaac on this migration are her parents, eight siblings many with families and her grandparents. Also included in the move are several of Isaac’s brothers and their families. It had to have been an event to remember with the number of people involved.

Finally in Allen and neighboring Harding County the families settle down. Most continue farming. It’s at this point I realize that Rebecca would have moved across the state knowing she’d never visit the final resting place of her two sons again. Buried in a small church cemetery in Tuscarawas County I can only imagine her final farewell and heavy heart. Continue reading

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – If you could have lunch with any female family member who would it be?

Rebecca Holmes Williams

Rebecca Holmes Williams – photo in author’s possession

I read Randy Seaver’s prompt for Saturday Night Genealogy Fun and immediately thought I’m in on this one! Randy takes a cue from Lisa Alzo and her blog’s inspiring Women’s History month. Here’s our question:

If you could have lunch with any female family member (living or dead), or any famous female, who would it be and why? Where would you go? What would you eat?

Short of having lunch with every one of my female ancestors I’ve narrowed it down to two. Either my grandmother Flora Nantz Frueh who died when my dad was just a 17-year-old. So little is known about her or my gggrandmother Rebecca Holmes Williams. After much deliberation I went with Rebcca Holmes Williams.

I’d like to have a cup of coffee with Rebecca at her house early in 1872. My ggrandmother, her youngest child, would be an infant in a nearby crib. We could keep an eye on baby Mollie (Mary Ellen Williams Marshall) as we talked. By this time Rebecca has lived through enough for three lifetimes. I’m sure life’s wisdom is apparent in her.

Rebecca was born in 1833 in Tuscarawas County, Ohio. She married Isaac Williams there in Tuscarawas County in 1853. They were the parents of seven children but all four of their sons died either in infancy or as toddlers. The devastation this young couple must have felt Continue reading

Women’s History Month – Share a Favorite Recipe or Dish From Your Mom or Grandma

Dorothea Lowery Frueh

My Mom

Lisa Alzo over at The Accidental Genealogist is posting a series of blogging prompts to Celebrate Women’s History Month in March. The daily prompts give us the opportunity to write about our female ancestors. Today’s prompt is:

Share a favorite recipe from your mother or grandmother’s kitchen. Why is this dish your favorite? If you don’t have one that’s been passed down, describe a favorite holiday or other meal you shared with your family.

Now let me tell you my mom was not the world’s greatest cook. She did all right. Our meals were good but she didn’t have a flair for cooking or the desire to try new or different things. I can say this because I am my mother’s daughter. I cook well enough but I don’t pursue many new recipes or leaf through cookbooks. It’s just not my thing. So cooking or a favorite recipe isn’t something I’d readily associate with my mom. Except for one dish.

My mom’s homemade noodles. Whether it was chicken and noodles or beef and noodles (although I preferred beef and noodles) they were delicious!

I can still see her in the kitchen cracking eggs at the counter. She would separate the egg white from the yolk by pouring it between the two egg shell halves. There would be a bowl where the whites would drop and the separated yolk would go into another bowl. Mom would crack and sift a dozen eggs, then add flour and salt. There may have been other ingredients added that I missed as a kid. My sister has mom’s recipe so I need to get a copy from her.

Mom then rolled that mixture out on the floured counter top adding flour to keep the egg mixture from sticking to the rolling pin. Continue reading