John and Elizabeth Hays Marshall – This Week’s #52 Ancestors Meets Up With My Genealogy Road Trip

John Marshall, Elizabeth Hays Marshall, Little Beaver Pennsylvania

John Marshall, Elizabeth Hays Marshall, Little Beaver Pennsylvania

My sisters and I took off for the Daughters of Union Veterans National Convention in Gettysburg last week. We combined our convention with a Genealogy Road Trip.

As we were traveling east from Ohio to Pennsylvania, somewhere between the four and five hour mark, we found Little Beaver Cemetery in Lawrence County, PA.

Here in the beautifully, rolling Pennsylvania countryside is the final resting place of my 4x great grandparents John and Elizabeth Hays Marshall.

John Marshall, Elizabeth Hays Marshall, Little Beaver Pennsylvania

John Marshall, Little Beaver Pennsylvania

John Marshall was born in Glendermot, County Down Ireland on 24 January 1765. John’s parents were Patrick and Amanda Boyne Marshall.

John Marshall, Elizabeth Hays Marshall, Little Beaver Pennsylvania

Elizabeth Hays Marshall, Little Beaver Pennsylvania

Elizabeth Hays Marshall was born in Glencoe, Antrim Ireland on 1 October 1767. Elizabeth’s parents were Robert E. and Phoebe Britton Hays.

John and Elizabeth were the parents of eight children James Hays, John Jr, Mary (aka Polly), Joseph, Elizabeth, Jane, William and Anna. James Hays – the oldest is my 3x great grandfather.

They came to the U.S. between the births of their first and second child settling in Lawrence County Pennsylvania where they lived the rest of their lives. I certainly understand this. It’s a lovely area.

John Marshall died in Little Beaver, Lawrence County, Pennsylvania 26 August 1853. He was 88 years old.

Elizabeth died in Little Beaver, Lawrence County, Pennsylvania 17 May 1854. She was 86 years old.

Pennsylvania must have agreed with them since they both lived to a very nice old age into the 1850s. I also notice Elizabeth died nine months after John. I wonder if that is a coincidence, old age, or she couldn’t go on without him. (I know, I know, I have a fairy tale, romantic streak in me!)

This is the sum total of my info on John and Elizabeth Hays Marshall. If they happen to be in your family tree I’d love for you to contact me! Obviously I don’t have much info to share but I’d love to see yours!!

There were many other Marshalls buried in this same cemetery. After a little research I’ll share them with you. Maybe we can make a connection through them.

Thanks for reading this week’s #52 Ancestors post! See you next time!

James Hayes Marshall Jr #52 Ancestors

James H Marshall Jr

My great-great grandfather James Hayes Marshall Jr. is this week’s #52 Ancestor bio.

James was born 9 April 1823 to James Hayes Marshall Sr. and Nancy Jane Patterson. James Sr. was a War of 1812 veteran which would come to have an affect on Jr.’s adult life. James Jr. was one of seven children who all lived and farmed in Little Beaver Township, Lawrence County, Pennsylvania. He and his twin William were his parent’s fourth and fifth babies. As happened all too often during this time James’ mother Nancy died in 1829 the same year she gave birth to her seventh child. James was only six years old.

James Sr. remarried in 1834. With his new wife Mary Slaven they added three more children to the family. This same scenario would be replayed in James Jr.’s adult life as well.

My great-great grandfather James Jr. married Nancy Painter Steele on 22 January 1826 in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania. They had eight children. The first three were born in Lawrence County, PA. The family then moved to Vinton County, Ohio where two more children were born and the last three were born in Allen County, Ohio.

James Jr. and his wife Nancy purchased property in Vinton County along with James’s sister and brother-in-law. The Marshalls stayed in Vinton County long enough to produce two children. Father James Sr. had received land for his service in the War of 1812 and gave these parcels to his five sons. Which is how James Jr. and his family ended up in Allen County, Ohio. Continue reading

A Woman of Mystery #52Ancestors

Susannah Van Meter

Susannah Van Meter

My ancestor this week is a mysterious woman to me. Her place in my family tree has question marks all over it. She’s my great great grandmother Susannah Van Meter. Every phase of Susannah’s life seems to have a twist.

Born in Allen County Ohio, 28 August 1833, Susannah was the oldest child of James D. and Mariah Shriver Van Meter. Her parents were among the new settlers to the area and along with the extended family that moved into this part of the state, Susannah had to be one of the first children born in the area.

As her parents worked hard and prospered on their farm Susannah most certainly helped care for the eight younger siblings as they were added to the family. I will never know the contributing circumstances in Susannah’s life but at 27 years old, still unmarried and living with her parents she gives birth to a son.

I can’t begin to imagine the scandal being an unwed mother provoked during this time. James and Mariah were pioneers settlers, pillars of the community, this couldn’t have been easy for anyone involved. Yet to their credit I don’t find they kicked anyone out of their lives.

In 1864 Susannah weds a local widower who has six children. James Hayes Marshall Jr was ten years Susannah’s senior and had lost his wife only nine months earlier. I’m thinking this marriage is one of convenience for both parties. James needs someone to keep house and raise his children. Susannah needs to rip the scarlet letter from her bodice. Continue reading

A Guy You Want to Add to Your Family Tree #52Ancestors

George Marshall, Mary Ellen Williams Marshall, William Lloyd Marshall

George Shriver Marshall, Mary Ellen Williams Marshall, William Lloyd Marshall

My great grandfather George Shriver Marshall seems to be the kind of guy a girl would like to add to her family tree. Let me tell you why.

 

George was born 26 August 1868 to Susannah Van Meter and James Hayes Marshall Jr. Now George had seven half brothers and sisters from his father’s first marriage. Add to that his mother Susannah brought a child into this second marriage before having three other children along with George. This produces a house teeming with kids of all ages.

 

My first thought is that George, the second youngest, would get lost in this menagerie of family but as I research that isn’t the case. Named after a maternal uncle he seemed to have a close tie with his mom and as the years progressed valued his family enormously.

 

As this era would dictate George’s education was complete after the second grade. Maybe he was needed to work on the farm or perhaps once he learned to read and write that was all the education he needed. Whatever the reason he only attended school for two years.

 

As a young man George didn’t go far to find amour. He married a girl from the farm next door. On 31 October 1891 he wed the love of his life Mary Ellen Williams. He and Mary Ellen had three children, Gladys (my grandmother), Freda and William.

 

I find it really interesting that just 8+ years later in the 1900 Federal census George’s mother, Susannah, is living with the young family. In fact she lived with them until early 1908 where a newspaper clipping notes Susannah went to live with a daughter nearby when George’s wife took sick. (I’m surprised George’s mom is living with him to begin with and not with the nearby sister.)

 

Sadly one of the darkest events in my family history took place soon after when George’s wife Mary Ellen died of consumption leaving him to raise their three children alone. That loss seemed to follow George for the rest of his life. He never remarried and once his oldest daughter Gladys married he lived with her and her family the rest of his life. Continue reading

She Didn’t Shy Away From Hard Tasks #52Ancestors

Gladys R Marshall Lowery

My maternal grandmother – Gladys R Marshall Lowery

It’s time for another week of #52 Ancestors. I debated on who to write about this week and was leaning toward a 3x great grandfather when I came across this picture while uploading photos to my new Flickr account. Isn’t it great?

This is my maternal grandmother Gladys B. Marshall (Lowery). I only have a fuzzy memory of her during the very last part of her life. Nothing to give me a real impression of the person she was but luckily we’re left with an assortment of photos of her throughout her life. Those pics give me a fantastic look at who she was.

A little info to go along with the pics, my grandmother was born 28 November 1892 in Allen County, Ohio. She was the oldest child of George S. Marshall and Mary Ellen Williams.

Gladys R Marshall Lowery

Gladys R Marshall Lowery

Gladys’ mom died of consumption when she was only 15 years old. Gladys took on the running of her family’s household at her mom’s death, including the care of her two younger siblings.

Gladys R Marshall Lowery

My grandmother is second from left with her dad and sister and brother

When Gladys married Basil R Lowery on 12 August 1912 her father George S. Marshall lived with the newlyweds until his death in 1944.

From these photos, those facts and a couple anecdotes I can say she was a strong, take charge woman. It looks like she felt comfortable being herself. From a little hoeing in her Sunday best to trousers for some down and dirty work, my grandmother apparently didn’t shy away from the hard tasks in her life.

Yet there’s that little grin in so many photos that says, “It’s all good”.

Gladys had four children, my mom being her youngest. I remember hearing the story about how my grandma came into town to visit my mom and my older siblings when they were just little kids and ended up ironing my dad’s Sunday shirts – every week. It certainly fits.

Gladys Marshall Lowery and Basil Lowery

Gladys Marshall Lowery and Basil Lowery

There’s also a memory passed down of her hollering to my grandfather Basil, “Base, crank up the machine!” Which is what she always called the automobile parked in front of the house. She wasn’t afraid of “the machine” and my grandfather dutifully cranked it up every time she requested .

I have to think the Women’s Suffrage Movement played a part in the teenage and early married life of Gladys, along with being thrust into the task of raising her siblings. Did society’s events contribute to your leadership ability? Certainly the loss of your mom at such a young age did. How I’d love to ask her about all this and so much more! But for now I’ll settle for these pics and take a few pointers about strength and fortitude from my grandmother, Gladys B. Marshall Lowery.