Charles H Lowery #52 Ancestors

Charles Henry Lowery

Charles H Lowery

This week’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks is about my great-grandfather Charles Henry Lowery. Charles is the son of my Civil War veteran George Washington Lowery and Barbara Ann Lowe. Charles was born 2 Sept 1872, in Sandusky County, Ohio. He married Sudie Louisa Barron on 30 Oct 1892 in Henry County, Ohio.

Charles and Sudie had ten children. My grandfather Basil was their third child.

Charles worked on the railroad which caused the family to move from Henry County, Ohio to Allen County, Ohio and finally Lenawee County, Michigan. By the time the family moved to Michigan a couple of the older children had married. My grandfather Basil was one of them. He didn’t make the move to Michigan and stayed in Allen County, Ohio with his young family.

(You might be interested in a quick look back at wife Sudie’s #52 Ancestors post. It tells a tale about Charles and their family life!)

Charles H Lowery and goat

Charles H Lowery and goat

Charles was my mother’s paternal grandfather. She would remember how her grandfather Charles boasted of his Ohio grandchildren whenever they made the trip to Michigan for a visit. He’d buy them penny candy and it would be waiting their arrival in a brown paper bag. My mom remembered him fondly.

I know my family attended Lowery family reunions in Michigan way back when. I wish I had been there. I’d love to know all of those stories today.

Charles passed away 13 Mar 1946 in Washtenew County, MI. He was 73 years old.

She Didn’t Shy Away From Hard Tasks #52Ancestors

Gladys R Marshall Lowery

My maternal grandmother – Gladys R Marshall Lowery

It’s time for another week of #52 Ancestors. I debated on who to write about this week and was leaning toward a 3x great grandfather when I came across this picture while uploading photos to my new Flickr account. Isn’t it great?

This is my maternal grandmother Gladys B. Marshall (Lowery). I only have a fuzzy memory of her during the very last part of her life. Nothing to give me a real impression of the person she was but luckily we’re left with an assortment of photos of her throughout her life. Those pics give me a fantastic look at who she was.

A little info to go along with the pics, my grandmother was born 28 November 1892 in Allen County, Ohio. She was the oldest child of George S. Marshall and Mary Ellen Williams.

Gladys R Marshall Lowery

Gladys R Marshall Lowery

Gladys’ mom died of consumption when she was only 15 years old. Gladys took on the running of her family’s household at her mom’s death, including the care of her two younger siblings.

Gladys R Marshall Lowery

My grandmother is second from left with her dad and sister and brother

When Gladys married Basil R Lowery on 12 August 1912 her father George S. Marshall lived with the newlyweds until his death in 1944.

From these photos, those facts and a couple anecdotes I can say she was a strong, take charge woman. It looks like she felt comfortable being herself. From a little hoeing in her Sunday best to trousers for some down and dirty work, my grandmother apparently didn’t shy away from the hard tasks in her life.

Yet there’s that little grin in so many photos that says, “It’s all good”.

Gladys had four children, my mom being her youngest. I remember hearing the story about how my grandma came into town to visit my mom and my older siblings when they were just little kids and ended up ironing my dad’s Sunday shirts – every week. It certainly fits.

Gladys Marshall Lowery and Basil Lowery

Gladys Marshall Lowery and Basil Lowery

There’s also a memory passed down of her hollering to my grandfather Basil, “Base, crank up the machine!” Which is what she always called the automobile parked in front of the house. She wasn’t afraid of “the machine” and my grandfather dutifully cranked it up every time she requested .

I have to think the Women’s Suffrage Movement played a part in the teenage and early married life of Gladys, along with being thrust into the task of raising her siblings. Did society’s events contribute to your leadership ability? Certainly the loss of your mom at such a young age did. How I’d love to ask her about all this and so much more! But for now I’ll settle for these pics and take a few pointers about strength and fortitude from my grandmother, Gladys B. Marshall Lowery.

The Only Grandparent I Remember #52Ancestors

Basil R LoweryIt’s Week 2 of 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. If you’re not exactly sure what’s going on have a look at this post that explains this year long adventure as suggested by Amy Johnson Crow.

Last week I wrote about my paternal grandfather and as I debated what clever way I should climb my family tree I decided to hopscotch back and forth between my maternal and paternal lines. So this week I’m writing about my maternal grandfather.

Basil Rue Lowery was born February 27, 1895 in Henry County, Ohio. He was the third of ten children. Basil’s father Charles worked for the railroad and during his teenage years the family moved to Allen County, Ohio for his dad’s work. Well you know what happens when you’re a teenager in Allen County, Ohio. You fall in love and get married!

Even though Charles’ work again prompted the family to move to Michigan, Basil stayed in Ohio and wed Gladys Marshall August 12, 1912. The Lowery’s went on to have four children, my mom Dorothea, being their youngest.

He worked for National Lime and Stone and took a terrible fall at the quarry that put him in a body cast for an entire summer. My genea-buddy sister was just a baby that summer and my dad said she was the only grandchild that wasn’t afraid of grandpa in his body cast. My sister went on to have a special life long relationship with him.

My grandma didn’t call him Basil she referred to him as Base. I have a photo of him and on the back he’s identified as Base Lowery. That’s the only bit of her handwriting I have. Continue reading

It Was Right Under My Nose!!

Family history, genealogy, family tree, Marshall, Williams

Gladys Marshall Lowery’s Autograph Book

You know how sometimes you’re hesitant to tell a story about yourself because you know it makes you look like a goof? Well I thought twice about telling this story but what the heck. Here goes . . .

Recently I’ve seen a couple posts about autograph books. Very cool books indeed and I remembered have my maternal grandmother’s autograph book. My mom gave it to me years and years ago. It’s been safely put away for sometime now. My recent blog readings made me hunt it up.

It took only a few moments to pull out my grandmother’s autograph book. I knew exactly where it was. The cover and pages are in really nice shape, it’s just that the binding is broken. So gently and ever so carefully I turn every page.

My grandmother, Gladys B. Marshall Lowery was born in 1892 in Allen County, Ohio. The earliest message in her book is January 5, 1903. Maybe this album was a Christmas gift. She’d have been 10 years old then and I imagine this was a prized possession.

As I look through the pages some notes are signed “your cousin” with vaguely familiar names.

Nov 29. 1909.
Cousin Gladys,
Love your playmates
Love your toys;
But never never love
the boys.
Your cousin,
Ida Kidd

Later my grandmother wrote Battles after Ida’s last name. Thanks grandma for her married name!!

So I need to check these collateral family members out. Continue reading

Have you seen my Great Grandfather’s cane?

Marshall, Lowery, Williams Family History, genealogy

George S Marshall

I was searching through a closet today and came across my great-grandfather’s cane. It’s odd that I don’t remember how I got the cane. I’m sure my mom gave it to me. It belonged to her grandfather but I don’t remember how it actually came to be mine. Weird. I’m usually very good at that stuff. My great-grandfather, the owner of this cane, George S Marshall is somewhat of an enigma to me. I know very little about him but here’s a little of what I do know.

George was born in 1868 in Allen County, Ohio. He married my great-grandmother Mary Ellen Williams in 1891. They had three children, my grandmother Gladys was the oldest and they lived on a farm that’s only about 20 minutes from me today.

By all accounts life seemed good for the family. They had three children, were farmers and prospered. I have a couple of pictures of George and Mary Ellen in front of their house and on the farm. It was a happy life until 1908 when my great-grandmother died. Consumption was the cause listed on Mary Ellen’s death certificate. It may as well read “Tragic Ending” because George suddenly became a single father of two teenage girls and a small son. Continue reading