Civil War Quick Tip – Confederate Disability Applications Database

Yellow Hospital, Manassas, Va., July 1862 Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Yellow Hospital, Manassas, Va., July 1862
Credit: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Have you researched the Confederate Disability Applications Database? It’s on the Library of Virginia‘s website. This database contains the applications of Virginia Civil War veterans who sought help purchasing artificial limbs and other disability benefits after the war.

Available between 1867 and 1894 the Virginia General Assembly passed a measure which would help Civil War veterans in medical need. They set up a Board of Commissioners on Artificial Limbs and veterans applied for assistance whether it was for artificial limbs or other disability help. Applicants had to submit quite a bit of documentation to receive aid.

Information included: where they lived, what unit they served with, where they served and how they were injured. Veterans stated what help they were seeking and included their medical history after their injury. They submitted as much information as possible to receive the assistance requested. Very similar to a pension file, this information is available on the database.

You can find this and many more research tips in my book Ancestors In A Nation Divided – available in .pdf, Kindle and paperback. You’ll find the research help you need as you search for your veteran’s part in our country’s history.

Civil War Quick Tip – Researching your Indiana veteran

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This is a way cool site if you have a Civil War veteran from Indiana!

http://www.in.gov/icpr/2521.htm

They’ve indexed quite a number of records sets. Just look at this list from their website:

  • Governor Oliver P. Morton
  • Adjutant General Records
    • Index to the Muster Rolls
    • Hospital Records
    • Quartermaster Records
    • The Indiana Legion
    • 1862 Draft Records
  • Civil War Veterans’ Records
    • Enrollment of Soldiers, Widows, and Orphans
    • Indiana Veterans’ Home
    • 1939 WPA Veterans’ Grave Registration
  • Indiana Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Children’s Home
  • Camp Morton
  • Morgan’s Raid
  • Pension Files (not located in the Indiana State Archives)

Some information is digitized and on the website, other records are indexed and in the state archives. Good site to start your Indiana family research.

Keep researching your Civil War ancestor!

 

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If you’re interested in focusing your research on your Civil War ancestor check out Ancestors In A Nation Divided – available in Kindle and also in paperback. Great help as you seek your veteran’s place in our country’s history.

Also I’d love for you to sign up for my monthly tipsCivil War Research Tips – Finding More on Your Civil War Ancestor here. I’ll share pointers and info to help in researching your Civil War ancestor. Please take a moment to sign up and thanks so much!

Are you or a family member researching your Civil War ancestor?

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Check out Ancestors In A Nation Divided – available in Kindle and also in paperback. Great research help as you start to learn about your family in the Civil War.

Also

I’d love for you to sign up for my monthly tipsFinding more on your Civil War ancestor here. I’ll share pointers and info to help in researching your Civil War ancestor. Please take a moment to sign up and thanks so much!

Civil War Quick Tip – Researching Regular Army Civil War Ancestors

FBGenCircleLogo1Whenever I write about researching your Civil War ancestor I’m referring to the volunteer soldier. The guy who answered the call of his president and mustered in with his state’s militia, like the Mississippi or Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry.

Yet there were regular U.S. Army soldiers who fought during the Civil War and they also left a paper trail regarding their military service. Regular army soldiers’ records are archived differently than the volunteer soldier but still available for research.

Some places to start your research on your Regular Army Civil War Ancestor:

1. National Parks Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System at http://www.itd.nps.gov/

2. United States, Registers of Enlistments in the U. S. Army, 1798 – 1914
https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1880762

3. U.S. Army, Register of Enlistments, 1798-1914
http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=1198

4. United States – Civil War Widows and Other Dependents Pension Files
https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1922519

5. Returns from Military Posts – http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=1571

6. For a copy of your Regular Army veteran’s Pension File – National Archives http://www.archives.gov/research/military/genealogy.html

I hope these links help! Good Luck as you continue researching your Civil War ancestor.

 

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Great gift idea! Are you or a family member researching your Civil War ancestor? Check out Ancestors In A Nation Divided – available in Kindle and also in paperback. Great research help as you seek your veteran’s place in our country’s history.

Email me:

cindy at genealogycircle dot com if you’d like to order a signed copy. Thanks!

Also I’d love for you to sign up for my monthly tipsCivil War Research Tips here. I’ll share pointers and info to help in researching your Civil War ancestor. Please take a moment to sign up and thanks so much!

Civil War Quick Tip – Why do some Civil War battles have two names?

FBGenCircleLogo1Did you know that Union Civil War soldiers referred to previous battles fought by the river, creek or water close to the site? Antietam (Creek) or Pittsburg Landing are a couple examples you may recognize. It was thought that since many Union soldiers came from urban areas and were so taken by the beauty of the south’s geography they talked about battles mentioning the local natural landmarks.

On the other hand, more Confederate soldiers were from rural areas and were captivated by the cities they marched through and the various structures they contained. So southern soldiers referred to previous battles fought by the closest town, city or building. Such as Sharpsburg (MD) or Shiloh (TN).

Perhaps you refer to a Civil War battle place in the same manner, according to which side your ancestor fought. Either way now you know why Manassas is also known as Bull Run or Murfreesboro is aka Stones River.

Good Luck as you continue researching your Civil War ancestor.

 

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image

Great gift idea! Are you or a family member researching your Civil War ancestor? Check out Ancestors In A Nation Divided – available in Kindle and also in paperback. Great research help as you seek your veteran’s place in our country’s history.

Email me:

cindy at genealogycircle dot com if you’d like to order a signed copy. Thanks!

Also I’d love for you to sign up for my monthly tipsCivil War Research Tips here. I’ll share pointers and info to help in researching your Civil War ancestor. Please take a moment to sign up and thanks so much!