Crafting Genealogy: Put Them On A Pedestal

Framed Photo Pedestal

Framed Photo Pedestal

Good to see you again for Crafting Genealogy. This time we’re going to put you or your loved ones on a pedestal. A Framed Photo Pedestal! We’re working with a cool little shadow box frame and an unusual base. We’re going to put our shadow box on a wooden candlestick. This is a fun, easy project and can be finished in an afternoon.

Here’s what we’re going to need:

Unfinished wood candlestick – mine is about 7” tall from Hobby Lobby ($2.99)*
Unfinished wooden shadow box – this one is 6×8” again from Hobby Lobby ($4.99)**
Acrylic paint – today I’m using turquoise and white
Inexpensive paint brush
Wood glue
Family photo
Small piece scrapbook paper – about 6×8”

Framed Photo Pedestal

Framed Photo Pedestal Supplies

First I took my shadow box apart setting aside the piece of glass and wood backing. Using the turquoise acrylic paint I gave the frame and the interior pieces a quick coat. While they were drying I took the metal piece out of the top of the candle.

Framed Photo Pedestal

Framed Photo Pedestal – wooden candlestick

Please be careful with this step. The metal piece in my candlestick was glued down pretty well. I used a needle nose plier to bend the metal sides inward and a regular plier to pull the metal out. After the metal was out I painted the candlestick with the turquoise paint too. At this point you can either let your pieces air dry or move along the drying process with a hair dryer.

Framed Photo Pedestal

Framed Photo Pedestal – coat of paint

Once the frame and candlestick were dry I took the white paint and thinned it down just a little by adding a few drops of water. I wanted to cover the turquoise paint with the white yet having a bit of that turquoise hue show through. Add the water just a drop or two at a time. It’s surprising just how a couple drops will thin the white paint. Once the candlestick and frame are “washed” in this white paint allow them to dry or again speed up the drying with a hair dryer.

Framed Photo Pedestal

Framed Photo Pedestal – Second coat of paint

When this coat of paint was dry I put a little dab of the turquoise paint on my brush. Then I “painted” a scrap piece of paper removing most of the paint. With this dry brush method I sparingly, very sparingly applied paint to the candlestick and frame. My aim was a shabby, antique look for my finished project. It didn’t take long for this part to dry.

I used the wood glue to adhere the now finished frame to the top of the candlestick. I cleaned the glass on my frame, added a photo adhered to a piece of scrapbook paper and viola! A unique and rather cool photo frame pedestal! Painting two or three of these shadow boxes and candlesticks in a color that would accent your décor would make a great grouping on a shelf or end table. I certainly wish I’d made a couple more!

Now I know it’s hard to see the turquoise highlights on the frame and candlestick in this photo but they are there. I think this project would look great completely white too which would reduce a couple steps if you wanted your frames one color.

Framed Photo Pedestal

Framed Photo Pedestal

I hope you’ll try crafting your own Framed Photo Pedestal. If you do or make a variation of it, please send me a pic or two. I’ll share them in a future post which will give all of us even more ideas and inspiration.

In the mean time have fun Crafting Genealogy!

* Remember to use your 40% off coupon from your Sunday paper or smart phone app.
** I used a shadow box frame since the sides are wider and cover the top of the candlestick completely. If this isn’t a problem for you by all means use a regular frame to top the candlestick.

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2 thoughts on “Crafting Genealogy: Put Them On A Pedestal

    • Jana – Thank you so much for including two of my blog posts in the week’s Fab Finds! I appreciate it so much and read Fab Finds every week. There is so much there to read and learn. Many I’d miss without your post. You do a wonderful job every week. Thank you!

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