I waited on pins and needles for her answer!

My Mom's Graduation Picture

My Mom’s High School Graduation Picture

I was reading Deb Ruth’s blog post last week about an Accidental Family Tradition. Deb talks about naming her daughter Starr and through family research found the name had been handed down in her family since the 1600’s. Deb unknowingly continued a long family tradition. Now isn’t that cool?

It also reminded me of an “Accidental Family Tradition” in my family! My Mom always folded her bath towels in half, then in half again, then finally in thirds. It makes for a fluffy towel that doesn’t take up a lot of space. I never knew why my Mom didn’t just fold the towels in half, then half again, the whole way through like everyone else but as a kid I didn’t care. I just wanted to get ‘em folded and get outside.

As an adult my sisters and I were talking and accidentally found we all still fold our bath towels in thirds. Even my adult nieces chimed in that that’s how they folded their towels too! Wow! Three generations folding towels with this same quirk! So the next time I saw her, I wanted to ask my Mom why the towel folding idiosyncrasy?

I imagined my grandmother, or even great-grandmother had done this. I had visions of a narrow shelf in some Victorian home that was only wide enough for towels folded in thirds. My guess was this towel folding had preceded me by many generations. I couldn’t wait to find out and tell my sisters.

When I asked my Mom this earth-shattering question about towel folding, including my hope of an interesting family story, she just shook her head. She said quite simply and to my amazement she had worked at Woolworth’s Dept. store in high school in the Domestics Department. That’s how she was told to fold towels and she just continued to fold them that way in her own home. (Big sigh on my part!)

So there you have it! Three generations of my family fold their bath towels the way Woolworth’s did back in the 1930’s. Yep, I’d say that falls into the “Accidental Family Tradition” category. Wouldn’t you?

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10 thoughts on “I waited on pins and needles for her answer!

  1. I have to laugh, when I named my 1st child I gave her the middle name of Ann, which was one of y aunts middle names. After that,each kids middle name was a family name.
    As for the towels, I fold mine in thirds s well. Because it leaves more room in the closet. Took forever to get my youngest who now helps with the laundry to fold them like this. I the looking in the closet nd seeing them folded in half.

    • Terri – I know what you mean! I hate seeing towels folded any other way! LOL It took awhile to train my hubs! Ha-ha!
      Thanks for stopping and commenting! ~ Cindy

  2. Thanks for the shout-out! How fun to find your own accidental tradtion! Could see in my head your Mom’s matter of fact explantions of why everyone continues the towel folding tradition. Great post!

  3. I¡¯m still learning from you, while I¡¯m trying to reach my goals. I absolutely liked reading all that is written on your blog.Keep the stories coming. I liked it!

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  6. What a great story. I loved reading about accidental tradition. I don’t fold mine in thirds (I roll them) but I really do appreciate the history behind why your family does fold them that way. Great, fun and informative post. I love your stories. Looking forward to reading more.

    • Oh thank you Bernita for stopping by and your very kind comment. I still laugh at my own disappointment at the time that there wasn’t a “better” explanation on the towel folding. Now I realize the fun in this story and relish it! Thanks again for reading!!

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